#carnival #smalltown #saturdaynightlivin #Medford #Oregon

#carnival #smalltown #saturdaynightlivin #Medford #Oregon

1 note

#Hula and #LocoMoco helped my #hangover…#sunday #WhiskyRiver #sunshine

#Hula and #LocoMoco helped my #hangover…#sunday #WhiskyRiver #sunshine

1 note

Me n my Teddybear #dogface #doglife #doglove #2bitches

Me n my Teddybear #dogface #doglife #doglove #2bitches

After #hula drinks…both mines! #hula #NewHalau #SoHappy #DrankOn

After #hula drinks…both mines! #hula #NewHalau #SoHappy #DrankOn

1 note

#Revision complete and ready for the #Blacklist #writerslife #screenplays #filmmaking #DarlaRyder #Trilogy #writing #writers

#Revision complete and ready for the #Blacklist #writerslife #screenplays #filmmaking #DarlaRyder #Trilogy #writing #writers

I’m ready for #Baseball #Mets #NY #Queens #SpringFever

I’m ready for #Baseball #Mets #NY #Queens #SpringFever

1 note

#bacon #pear #coffee kinda morning #writing #screenplays #sunday

#bacon #pear #coffee kinda morning #writing #screenplays #sunday

Montgomery Clift photographed by Stanley Kubrick, 1949.

(Source: mattybing1025)

1,108 notes

#Caldera #IPA #BeerNerd #InstaDrank #FunInDaSun

#Caldera #IPA #BeerNerd #InstaDrank #FunInDaSun

cinephilearchive:

Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint on the set of ‘North by Northwest.’

Alarmed by reports that North by Northwest’s Mount Rushmore sequence would feature the actors engaging in murderous shenanigans all over the former presidents’ faces, including throwing an enemy agent off Lincoln’s nose to his death, Rushmore authorities denied Hitchcock’s request to shoot on location.

Recommended Reading: The iconic crop duster sequence

Instead, the sequence was shot on a sound stage using enormous, rear-projected still photographs as the background against which the actors were filmed. Set designer Robert Boyle also used studio mock-ups of sections of the stone heads — “just enough to put the actors on so we could get down shots, up shots, side shots, whatever we needed.” —The Man on Lincoln’s Nose

“Due to the objection of the government, we weren’t allowed to have any of the figures on the faces, even in the interior studio shots… We were told very definitely that we could only have the figures slide down between the heads of the presidents. They said that after all, this is the shrine to democracy.” —Alfred Hitchcock

In the 2000 documentary The Man on Lincoln’s Nose, production designer Robert F. Boyle described how they approached the set design: “The main problem in the Mount Rushmore sequence was to make it believable that two people could climb down the face of Mount Rushmore — it couldn’t be done, but we had to make it look believable. So, we went up to Mount Rushmore, climbed up the back and found that on the top of each one of the heads there was a huge iron ring, with a cable and bosun’s chair… We then lowered down each face and photographed in every direction possible every 10 feet and those became the backgrounds.”

The chase sequence was then storyboarded so that the photographs could be used either as mattes or blown up to form large canvas backdrops. The final effect was so convincing that Alice Hughes of Variety mistakenly reported, “This is no studio mock-up; the actual national monument serves as the scene in those last terrifying moments of sliding down the neck and chest of George Washington and the craggy features of Abraham Lincoln.” —Alfred Hitchcock Wiki

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